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Thursday, March 23, 2017
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4th Quarter - Week 28 - Power Point - Layout - CPU, Hardware/Software

Hardware/Software

You need both--can't use a computer unless you have both.

The HARDWARE is the equipment including:
1. the COMPUTER--often called the CPU (Central Processing Unit) or PC (Personal Computer)
2. the MONITOR (some people refer to it as the 'screen')
3. the KEYBOARD

These 3 basic components are called a SYSTEM

Other commonly used hardware devices are the MOUSE, SPEAKERS, HEADSETS, PRINTERS, SCANNERS, etc. These are known as PERIPHERALS (referring to the fact that they may surround the computer system but are not necessary, although the mouse is now needed by anyone (really almost everyone) who doesn't know the keyboard shortcuts for using Windows without a mouse.

The SOFTWARE is the PROGRAMS--including Windows. Every time you click an icon from the desktop or through the start menu you are using a software program or part of a program. The most commonly used programs include word processors, games, and Internet web browsers.

Software and Hardware go hand in hand. You can't use one without the other. And your hardaware must be able to handle the software you use. For example you can't go online (Internet browsers require Windows) if you have an old DOS based computer. This software/hardware dependency is what drives the computer industry--newer software often requires more powerful hardware, so people keep buying new computers to replace perfectly functioning, yet limited, older computers.

---------------------------------------------


CPU

The main chip--short for 'Central Processing Unit'. Called the 'processor'. By technical purists it (and only it) is called the 'COMPUTER'

The COMPUTER is NOT technically “the electronic box”. But because we commonly call the 'box' the 'computer' that is how the lesson was presented. Now that we've settled that we'll
get deeper into exactly what is in the 'box'.

The CPU (Central Processing Unit) is a relatively tiny CHIP--measuring about 2 x 2 x 1/4
inch--which you have probably heard of through advertisements as 'Intel Inside', 'Pentium
Processor', 'Celeron Processor', or 'MMX Technology'. Older 'computers' have a '486',
'386', '286', or '8088' processor (or main chip).

CPUs are made of silicon and consist of thousands of tiny circuits which are often layered
one atop many others. The ability to add more layers and to manufacture smaller circuits
results in today’s more powerful CPUs that are not much larger than the old “8088” main
chips and not much more expensive considering their advanced capabilities.

CPUs (main chips) are attached to a MOTHER BOARD which also contains various other
chips, transistors, circuits, fuses, and slots for things like video, sound, and modem/network
cards.

Also inside the 'electronic box' are the insides of the CD-ROM drive (most commonly
labeled the 'D drive') , floppy disk drive (or 'A drive'), and the hard drive ('C drive') along
with various cables, connectors, and other doomajiggees.

It's not as complicated as it may sound. In my humble opinion, your auto
mechanic has had to learn a heck of a lot more to fix your car than a
computer technician has had to learn to fix your computer. I say this because
technicians seldom 'fix' anything--they troubleshoot the problem, then do
things like reconnect loose wires/connections, REPLACE a faulty part
(because replacing the part is usually cheaper in this labor
intensive/expensive process than fixing it and because a better part is
available now cheaper than what you paid for the older/lesser part), or fiddle
with the software (the hardest part to figure out). And believe it or not there
are far FEWER parts to a computer system (except when the parts are
being produced at the factory) than there are parts to your car.

Hands On: 
Ads r Rong online activity at
http://www.stphilipneri.org/teacher/ccampanella/section.php?id=502

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

OBJECTIVE/TOPIC:

To use an online site to input data and information.

 La. Performance Indicator 1.Technology Communication Tools -- Use technology tools (e.g., multimedia authoring, writing tools, digital cameras, drawing tools, web tools) to gather information for problem solving, communication, collaborative writing and publishing to create products for various audiences. (1,3,4)



PROCEDURE:

1. Lecture -- See above.

Hands on -- http://www.stphilipneri.org/~spn1/php/section.php?id=502


HOMEWORK:

NA


GROUPING:  _X_ I

____SM

____W

_X_ CL

ASSESSMENT: X -- IO

_X_PB

___PP

TECHNOLOGY _X_

 


OBJECTIVE/TOPIC:
NA

PROCEDURE:
NA

HOMEWORK:
NA

 

 

 

 

OBJECTIVE/TOPIC:
Same as Monday

PROCEDURE:
Same as Monday

HOMEWORK:
NA

GROUPING:
Same as Monday

TECHNOLOGY _X_



OBJECTIVE/TOPIC:
Same as Monday

PROCEDURE:
Same as Monday

HOMEWORK:
NA

GROUPING:
Same as Monday

TECHNOLOGY _X_

 

OBJECTIVE/TOPIC:
Same as Monday

PROCEDURE:
Same as Monday

HOMEWORK:
NA

GROUPING:
Same as Monday

TECHNOLOGY _X_

 

Grouping: I = Independent; SM = Small Group; W = Whole Group; CL = Cooperative Learning

Assessment: IO = Informal Observation; PB = Performance Based; PP = Paper and Pencil

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